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Taly Cohen (b. 1978) is a contemporary artist based in São Paulo, Brazil. Her work explores urban space, the human condition, and her cultural heritage. Cohen’s art is recognized for its vibrancy and rich colors, reflecting the diversity of Brazilian culture and the vivacity of its people. Her paintings incorporate vinyl, acrylic, spray paint, collage, and acrylic ink pen. The strong serpentine lines in her work superimposed over abstract, dreamlike vistas allude to one's lineage, in particular to Cohen's own Jewish ancestry. She honors the survival of her grandmother and other ancestors during the Holocaust, and their passion to live and thrive. Her maternal grandparents collected European art while living in Poland. Their collection was confiscated by the Nazis, but their love of art was never stolen and has been passed down to Cohen’s two young daughters. Cohen began painting at age 9, repeating and connecting the lines in her work to underscore her bond with her heritage.

Her Quarantine Windows, which weave together polyethylene, silk, grosgrain, and satin net onto wooden chassis, reflect her desire to unite people and her exploration of isolation and fear. The series began with her weaving the child safety net outside her balcony. The nets are ubiquitous in Brazil's major cities, where children are at risk of tumbling from high-rise apartment buildings. Cohen’s colorful creation, intended to communicate with the outside world, garnered massive social media and mainstream media attention in São Paulo and throughout Brazil, prompting her to build on the universal themes of alienation and the quest for social interaction. The urban installation on her balcony emerged as a new form of public art exhibition. Each sculptural installation, intended to be hung on the wall, relies on different materials to depict hope and a collective desire to connect with the outside world. The works are framed by windows, including those reclaimed from blighted buildings, to breathe new life into the urban landscape. Some incorporate zippers to illustrate the opening and closing of the world over the last year, while delicate fabrics reveal the fragility of human life.

Culture, art, and music were constant influences throughout Cohen’s childhood. In 2019, women comprised a mere 6 percent of all artists represented by galleries and museums in Brazil, but Cohen’s career took off quickly after she earned her BFA at FAAP (Armando Alvares Penteado Foundation), one of the most prestigious academic institutions in Brazil. She has earned various professional certifications in video editing (Senac Sao Paulo, or the National Service for Commercial Learning), fashion design (Senac and IBModa, Brazilian Fashion Institute), graphic design (FAAP), and publicity (Escola Panamericana de Artes, or Pan American School of Art). Her work has been on view at several solo exhibitions in Brazil, as well as group shows in Brazil and the United States, including Art Basel Miami and White Porch Gallery in Miami. Chase Contemporary is the first New York gallery to represent Cohen.